Tag Archives: collectives

10 Step Guide On How To Make “Grade A” (Edible) Cannabis Extract Hash Oil

edible marijuana oil concentrates

edible marijuana oil concentrate

Step 1 (Preparation): Before starting this sequence, it is very important that you take proper precautions, have the proper supplies and the a decent preparation area.

You will need the following supplies: 1 ounce of super dry marijuana, 1 gallon of high proof alcohol solvent (Everclear works best), medium sized Pyrex mixing bowl, large wooden spoon, straining device (Muslin Bag works best), a separate container to catch strained liquid, double boiler setup, silicon spatula, plastic syringes.

Preparation Area: You must also be sure to have the proper ventilation(open windows/fan), as well as an electric stove (gas stoves are more dangerous with solvent), and a fire extinguisher.

Step 2 (Grind): Place 1 ounce of extremely dry and ground up marijuana (sativa or indica) into a medium sized, Pyrex glass mixing bowl. Make sure you can spare a few inches above the marijuana grind, as liquid will be added soon.

Step 3 (Dissolve): Add Everclear or another high proof alcohol solvent which will cover the marijuana in it’s entirety, with about an inch of additional solvent on top.

(Caution: never use rubbing alcohol as a solvent)

Step 4 (Mix): Slowly mix the Everclear and marijuana together in the bowl for just about 3 minutes. Use a large wooden spoon/large fork to mix the marijuana with the solvent, allowing for the solvent to dissolve resin and oils from the herb.

Step 5 (Strain):  Delicately pour the marijuana solvent mix through a straining device e.g(muslin bag, grain, cheesecloth, Thai filter, steeping bag, etc) into a separate 2 quart mixing bowl or large bowl.The strained concoction should be dark with greenish undertones.

 Step 6 (Repeat): Place marijuana material back into original mixing bowl and repeat steps 2, 3, and 4 in order to remove all oil and resin from the marijuana a second time.

(Caution: repeating the straining process a third time will ruin your batch as the remaining marijuana resin will have little to no benefit.)

Step 7 (Boil): Pour dark green mixture from both washes into the top of a double- boiler. Make sure that the bottom pot of the double-boiler is filled with water before turning on the heat.

(Caution: if you don’t have enough space for all of the mix in the double-boiler you can continue to add the remaining marijuana mix as the level in the double-boiler begins to drop during the evaporation process. )

Step 8 (Evaporate): Begin heating the liquid on high setting until the top pot of the double boiler starts bubbling, then turn the heat off promptly.Allow the heat from the bath of water to heat the top pan until the Everclear or high proof alcohol solvent has evaporated. Once you see that the dark green mixture is bubbling, immediately turn off the heat. This process can take anywhere from 15-25 minutes.

Step 9 (Almost Done): You are done when the liquid has become a thick green substance and no longer bubbles. If the liquid has ceased to bubble but is somewhat runny, you can turn the heat back on low until it starts bubbling again and you are satisfied with consistency.

Step 10 (Cool Down): Use plastic syringes to draw up the remaining which will allow you to create individual portions for future medical use. The semi thick liquid will become thicker once it cools. Be sure to dry the left over oil in a cool, dry place.

 

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A No-Frills Guide To Buying Weed In Colorado

how to buy marijuana in colorado

The great state of Colorado opened it’s doors to Marijuana use on January 1st , 2014 (aka Green Wednesday).  The marijuana dispensary doors are now officially open for business and you want to get in on the action, here’s a few things you should know without having to read the Colorado marijuana use laws.

Who Can Buy Marijuana For Recreational Use?  Colorado’s age requirement to buy Marijuana is anyone that is 21 and older with a valid government issued ID.  As long as you are of age, you can legally purchase, possess, and smoke Marijuana in the state.  Colorado also has what I call a “sharing is caring” clause.  You can share your weed with anyone else who is 21 years or older as long there is no exchange of Marijuana for money.

I’m Not From Colorado, Can I Still Buy Marijuana?  The same laws apply to all United States citizens as stated above.  As long as your over 21 years of age with valid ID, you can cruise into a licensed retail shop and buy up to 1/4 ounce (out-of-state limitation)

What If I’m Not 21 Years Old But Over 18?  Great news for those over 18 years old but under 21, you can still buy Marijuana as long as you have a medical marijuana card.  Colorado legalized medical marijuana in 2000 but has now dropped the annual registration fee for the medical marijuana card to only $15 per year!

OK, I’m Finally In Colorado, Where Can I Buy Weed?  There have been 136 retail marijuana shop licenses issued throughout Colorado but MOST of these are in Denver.  But if you somehow find yourself in Summit County, there are four shops there as well.

How Much Marijuana Can I Buy?  If your a Colorado resident, you can buy up to 1 ounce of weed (equivalent to 60 normal sized joints) and out-of-state visitors can buy 1/4 ounce of weed at one time (equivalent to 15 normal sized joints).  That’s still alot of joints so there is nothing to worry about with this limitation.

Lastly, How Much Money Should I Prepare?  Your typical purchase of an eighth of an ounce will run anywhere between $25 to $45 with taxes on top.  The state tax is set at 25% and a very nice 5% city/county tax assessed in most places.

I Didn’t Smoke All My Weed, Can I Take It Back Home For My Family And Friends?  No.  Although you bought it legally, it is still illegal to take it with you across state lines.  It can even be tricky to transporting weed from city to city within Colorado because each city  and county have set their own individual marijuana laws.

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California Medical Marijuana Dispensaries Disappearing in 2013

dispensary raid cartoon

California had legalized medical marijuana close to 17 years ago and yet we still seem to see problems arising between dispensary owners and the government.  To be clear, the Federal government is to blame for these shrinking numbers we are seeing from San Francisco all the way down to San Diego.  The dispensaries being shut down are all businesses who have been a victim of random raids carried out by the federal Drug Enforcement Agency, or better known as the DEA.  Since the “Cole Memo” written by Assistant Attorney General James Cole in the summer of 2011, dispensaries have been under attack by the government with no end in sight.  As StopTheDrugWar.org has put it, the Cole memo along with California’s four US Attorneys declared “open season on dispensaries.”

Due to this announcements, city officials have taken independent action on localized legislation.  Los Angeles had well over 500 dispensaries prior to 2010 and that number is planned to be reduced to 135 in 2013.  Another big hit taken was Anaheim which had over 143 dispensaries in 2007, now down to 11 dispensaries in 2013.  Those last 11 were ordered to be shut down by the end of the year.  Other major cities across California has followed suit such as San Bernardino, Riverside County, Bakersfield, Palm Springs, Thousand Palms, Santa Ana, and Stockton.  These cases are not just a regulatory move to restrict the number of dispensaries open, but rather moving toward a full ban on the medical marijuana dispensary industry as a whole.

If cities were so afraid of the collectives setting up shop all around the city, they should take a page from Palm Spring’s zoning strategy allowing a certain number of collectives to operate in a certain area, thereby allowing safe access to those who need medical marijuana than to outright ban and shut down all currently operating collectives.

All this trouble marijuana users and distributors can all be traced back to a single Supreme Court decision in the case of City of Riverside v. Inland Empire Patients Health and Wellness Center handed down in May of 2013.  The Supreme Court Justices unanimously ruled that that localities could use their zoning powers to ban dispensaries in addition to regulate them.  This decision gave the green light for major cities to start making moves on all collectives under its own power, and those that pose more problems to shut down are handed over to the DEA to deal with.

What does this all mean for the future of California collectives?  From the time this article was written, no dispensary owner is safe from their own city nor the federal government.  Although this report may seem grim, not all hope has been lost, yet.  The Cannabis and Hemp Freedom Act of 2014 has published by SaveCannabis.org as an open source grassroots effort with hundreds of California advocates behind this legislation.  The objective for this is for this legislation to be completed in time to make it onto the 2014 ballot.  As an open source document, suggestions and edits can be provided by you, as an advocate, through their website.

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